Miles Fitz Walter Earl of Hereford1

M, d. 24 December 1143
     Miles was born.1 He married Sibyl de Neufmarche, daughter of Bernard de Neufmarche Lord of Brecon and Nesta of Wales, in 1121.1 Miles died on 24 December 1143.1

Citations

  1. [S308] Ancestral Roots, Seventh ed. , 152.

Sibyl de Neufmarche

F
Father*Bernard de Neufmarche Lord of Brecon d. 1093
Mother*Nesta of Wales
     Sibyl was born.1 She married Miles Fitz Walter Earl of Hereford in 1121.1

Citations

  1. [S308] Ancestral Roots, Seventh ed. , 152.

Bernard de Neufmarche Lord of Brecon1

M, d. 1093
     He married Nesta of Wales, daughter of Osborn Fitz Richard Sheriff of Hereford and Nesta of North Wales.1 Bernard died in 1093.1

Citations

  1. [S308] Ancestral Roots, Seventh ed. , 152.

Nesta of Wales

F
Father*Osborn Fitz Richard Sheriff of Hereford d. a 1100
Mother*Nesta of North Wales b. c 1056
     Nesta was born.1 Her married name was Neufmarche.1 She married Bernard de Neufmarche Lord of Brecon.1

Citations

  1. [S308] Ancestral Roots, Seventh ed. , 152.

Osborn Fitz Richard Sheriff of Hereford1

M, d. after 1100
     He married Nesta of North Wales, daughter of Gruffyd (Griffith) ap Llywellyn and Aedgyth (Edith) of Mercia.1 Osborn died after 1100.1

Family

Nesta of North Wales b. c 1056
Child

Citations

  1. [S308] Ancestral Roots, Seventh ed. , 152.

Nesta of North Wales

F, b. circa 1056
Father*Gruffyd (Griffith) ap Llywellyn d. 5 Aug 1063
Mother*Aedgyth (Edith) of Mercia d. a 1086
     Her married name was Fitz Richard.1 She married Osborn Fitz Richard Sheriff of Hereford.1 Nesta was born at perhaps, Wales, circa 1056.1

Citations

  1. [S308] Ancestral Roots, Seventh ed. , 152.

Gruffyd (Griffith) ap Llywellyn

M, d. 5 August 1063
     Gruffyd was born at Wales.1 He was Prince of North Wales and, after 1039, King of Gwynedd and Powys.1 He married Aedgyth (Edith) of Mercia, daughter of Aelfgar, Earl of Mercia Earl of East Anglia and Aelfgifu unknown, circa 1057.1 Gruffyd died on 5 August 1063. Battle wounds.1

Family

Aedgyth (Edith) of Mercia d. a 1086
Child

Citations

  1. [S308] Ancestral Roots, Seventh ed. , 151.

Aedgyth (Edith) of Mercia

F, d. after 1086
Father*Aelfgar, Earl of Mercia Earl of East Anglia d. a 1062
Mother*Aelfgifu unknown
     Aedgyth was born at Mercia, England.1 She married Gruffyd (Griffith) ap Llywellyn circa 1057.2 As of 1064,her married name was England.1 She married Harold II, Godwinson, King of England in 1064.1 Aedgyth died after 1086.1

Family 1

Gruffyd (Griffith) ap Llywellyn d. 5 Aug 1063
Child

Family 2

Harold II, Godwinson, King of England d. 14 Oct 1066

Citations

  1. [S308] Ancestral Roots, Seventh ed. , 152.
  2. [S308] Ancestral Roots, Seventh ed. , 151.

Harold II, Godwinson, King of England1

M, d. 14 October 1066
     He married Aedgyth (Edith) of Mercia, daughter of Aelfgar, Earl of Mercia Earl of East Anglia and Aelfgifu unknown, in 1064.1 Harold died on 14 October 1066 at The Battle of Hastings, Hastings, England. Of battle wounds.2

Family

Aedgyth (Edith) of Mercia d. a 1086

Citations

  1. [S308] Ancestral Roots, Seventh ed. , 152.
  2. [S308] Ancestral Roots, Seventh ed. , 151.

Aelfgar, Earl of Mercia Earl of East Anglia1

M, d. after 1062
Father*Leofric, Earl of Mercia
Mother*Godgifu (Godiva) of Mercia b. c 1010
     Aelfgar, was born.1 He married Aelfgifu unknown.1 Aelfgar, died after 1062.1

Citations

  1. [S308] Ancestral Roots, Seventh ed. , 152.

Aelfgifu unknown

F

Citations

  1. [S308] Ancestral Roots, Seventh ed. , 152.

Leofric, Earl of Mercia1

M
     Leofric, was born.1 He married Godgifu (Godiva) of Mercia in 1030.1

Citations

  1. [S308] Ancestral Roots, Seventh ed. , 151.

Godgifu (Godiva) of Mercia

F, b. circa 1010
Lady Godiva. Painting by John Collier, ca 1897. Herbert Art Gallery and Museum, Coventry, England.
     She was the famous "Lady Godiva" of song and legend.

Godiva (Old English: Godgifu, "god gift"), often referred to as Lady Godiva (fl. 1040–1080), was an Anglo-Saxon noblewoman who, according to legend, rode naked through the streets of Coventry, in England, in order to gain a remission of the oppressive taxation imposed by her husband on his tenants. The name "Peeping Tom" for a voyeur originates from later versions of this legend in which a man named Tom had watched her ride and was struck blind or dead.

Lady Godiva was the wife of Leofric, Earl of Mercia. Her name occurs in charters and the Domesday survey, though the spelling varies. The Old English name Godgifu or Godgyfu meant "gift of God"; Godiva was the Latinised version. Since the name was a popular one, there are contemporaries of the same name.

If she was the same Godgifu who appears in the history of Ely Abbey, the Liber Eliensis, written at the end of 12th century, then she was a widow when Leofric married her. Both Leofric and Godiva were generous benefactors to religious houses. In 1043 Leofric founded and endowed a Benedictine monastery at Coventry. Writing in the 12th century, Roger of Wendover credits Godiva as the persuasive force behind this act. In the 1050s, her name is coupled with that of her husband on a grant of land to the monastery of St Mary, Worcester and the endowment of the minster at Stow St Mary, Lincolnshire. She and her husband are commemorated as benefactors of other monasteries at Leominster, Chester, Much Wenlock and Evesham. She gave Coventry a number of works in precious metal made for the purpose by the famous goldsmith Mannig, and bequeathed a necklace valued at 100 marks of silver. Another necklace went to Evesham, to be hung around the figure of the Virgin accompanying the life-size gold and silver rood she and her husband gave, and St Paul's Cathedral, London received a gold-fringed chasuble.[8] She and her husband were among the most munificent of the several large Anglo-Saxon donors of the last decades before the Conquest; the early Norman bishops made short work of their gifts, carrying them off to Normandy or melting them down for bullion.

The manor of Woolhope in Herefordshire, along with four others, was given to the cathedral at Hereford before the Norman Conquest by the benefactresses Wulviva and Godiva – usually held to be this Godiva and her sister. The church there has a 20th century stained glass window representing them.

Her mark, di Ego Godiva Comitissa diu istud desideravi, appears on a charter purportedly given by Thorold of Bucknall to the Benedictine monastery of Spalding. However, this charter is considered spurious by many historians. Even so it is possible that Thorold, who appears in the Domesday Book as sheriff of Lincolnshire, was her brother.

After Leofric's death in 1057, his widow lived on until sometime between the Norman Conquest of 1066 and 1086. She is mentioned in the Domesday survey as one of the few Anglo-Saxons and the only woman to remain a major landholder shortly after the conquest. By the time of this great survey in 1086, Godiva had died, but her former lands are listed, although now held by others.[12] Thus, Godiva apparently died between 1066 and 1086.

The place where Godiva was buried has been a matter of debate. According to the Chronicon Abbatiae de Evesham, or Evesham Chronicle, she was buried at the Church of the Blessed Trinity at Evesham, which is no longer standing. But, according to the authoritative account in the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, "There is no reason to doubt that she was buried with her husband at Coventry, despite the assertion of the Evesham chronicle that she lay in Holy Trinity, Evesham."
According to the popular story, Lady Godiva took pity on the people of Coventry, who were suffering grievously under her husband's oppressive taxation. Lady Godiva appealed again and again to her husband, who obstinately refused to remit the tolls. At last, weary of her entreaties, he said he would grant her request if she would strip naked and ride through the streets of the town. Lady Godiva took him at his word and, after issuing a proclamation that all persons should stay indoors and shut their windows, she rode through the town, clothed only in her long hair. Only one person in the town, a tailor ever afterwards known as Peeping Tom, disobeyed her proclamation in one of the most famous instances of voyeurism. In the story, Tom bores a hole in his shutters so that he might see Godiva pass, and is struck blind. In the end, Godiva's husband keeps his word and abolishes the onerous taxes.

The oldest form of the legend has Godiva passing through Coventry market from one end to the other while the people were assembled, attended only by two knights. This version is given in Flores Historiarum by Roger of Wendover (died 1236), a somewhat gullible collector of anecdotes, who quoted from an earlier writer. The later story, with its episode of "Peeping Tom," appeared first among 17th century chroniclers.
At the time, it was customary for penitents to make a public procession in their shift, a sleeveless white garment similar to a slip today and one which was certainly considered "underwear." Thus, some scholars speculate, Godiva may have actually travelled through town as a penitent, in her shift. Godiva's story may have passed into folk history to be recorded in a romanticised version. Another theory has it that Lady Godiva's "nakedness" may refer to her riding through the streets stripped of her jewellery, the trademark of her upper class rank. However, both these attempts to reconcile known facts with legend are weak; there is no known use of the word "naked" in the era of the earliest accounts to mean anything other than "without any clothing whatsoever."

Moreover, there is no trace of any version of the story in sources contemporary with Godiva, a story that would certainly have been recorded even in its most tame interpretations. Additionally, with the founding of Coventry circa 1043, there was little opportunity for the city to have developed to an extent that would have supported such a noble gesture. Lastly, the only recorded tolls were on horses. Thus, it remains doubtful whether there is any historical basis for the famous ride.

Like the story of Peeping Tom, the claim that Godiva's long hair effectively hid her nakedness from sight is generally believed to have been a later addition (cf. Rapunzel)[citation needed]. Certain other thematic elements are familiar in myth and fable: the resistant Lord (cf. Esther and Ahasuerus), the exacted promise, the stringent condition and the test of chastity. Even if Peeping Tom is a late addition, his being struck blind demonstrates the closely knit themes of the violated mystery and the punished intruder

The preceding was copied from Wikipedia 8 Feb 2011.
Godgifu was born circa 1010.1 As of 1030,her married name was Mercia.1 She married Leofric, Earl of Mercia in 1030.1

Citations

  1. [S308] Ancestral Roots, Seventh ed. , 151.

Roger de Quincy 2nd Earl of Winchester1

M, d. 25 April 1264
Father*Saher de Quincy 1st Earl of Winchester b. 1155, d. 3 Nov 1219
Mother*Margaret de Beaumont d. 12 Jan 1235
     Roger was born at England.1 He married Helen of Galloway, daughter of Alan , Lord of Galloway and ? de Lacy.1 Roger died on 25 April 1264.1

Family

Helen of Galloway
Children

Citations

  1. [S308] Ancestral Roots, Seventh ed. , 58.

Helen of Galloway

F
Father*Alan , Lord of Galloway d. 1234
Mother*? de Lacy d. 1243

Family

Roger de Quincy 2nd Earl of Winchester d. 25 Apr 1264
Children

Citations

  1. [S308] Ancestral Roots, Seventh ed. , 42.
  2. [S308] Ancestral Roots, Seventh ed. , 58.

Robert de Quincy Lord of Buckley1

M, b. after 1100, d. circa 1198
Father*Saher de Quincy d. a 1160
Mother*Maud de St. Liz d. 1140
     He was a Crusader with King Richard the Lionheart of England. He married Orabella de Leuchars.1 Robert was born after 1100.2 Robert died circa 1198.1

Citations

  1. [S308] Ancestral Roots, Seventh ed. , 58.
  2. [S336] "Register."

Orabella de Leuchars

F
     Orabella was born at Scotland.1 Her married name was Quincy.2 She married Robert de Quincy Lord of Buckley, son of Saher de Quincy and Maud de St. Liz.2

Family

Robert de Quincy Lord of Buckley b. a 1100, d. c 1198
Child

Citations

  1. [S336] "Register."
  2. [S308] Ancestral Roots, Seventh ed. , 58.

Saher de Quincy1

M, d. after 1160
     He married Maud de St. Liz, daughter of Simon de St. Liz, Earl of Huntingdon and Maud, Countess of Huntingdon, at England after 1136.1 Saher died after 1160.2

Family

Maud de St. Liz d. 1140
Child

Citations

  1. [S308] Ancestral Roots, Seventh ed. , 130.
  2. [S336] "Register."

Maud de St. Liz

F, d. 1140
Father*Simon de St. Liz, Earl of Huntingdon d. 1111
Mother*Maud, Countess of Huntingdon d. c 1130
     Maud was born.1 She married Robert Fitz Richard.1 As of after 1136,her married name was Quincy.1 She married Saher de Quincy at England after 1136.1 Maud died in 1140.1

Family 1

Robert Fitz Richard d. c 1135

Family 2

Saher de Quincy d. a 1160
Child

Citations

  1. [S308] Ancestral Roots, Seventh ed. , 130.

Robert Fitz Richard

M, d. circa 1135
     He married Maud de St. Liz, daughter of Simon de St. Liz, Earl of Huntingdon and Maud, Countess of Huntingdon.1 Robert died circa 1135.1

Family

Maud de St. Liz d. 1140

Citations

  1. [S308] Ancestral Roots, Seventh ed. , 130.

Simon de St. Liz, Earl of Huntingdon1

M, d. 1111
     He married Maud, Countess of Huntingdon, daughter of Waltheof II, Earl of Huntingdon and Judith of Lens, at England circa 1090.1 Simon died in 1111.1

Family

Maud, Countess of Huntingdon d. c 1130
Child

Citations

  1. [S308] Ancestral Roots, Seventh ed. , 130.

Maud, Countess of Huntingdon1

F, d. circa 1130
Father*Waltheof II, Earl of Huntingdon1 b. c 1045, d. 31 May 1076
Mother*Judith of Lens1 b. 1054
     Maud, was born.1 She married Simon de St. Liz, Earl of Huntingdon at England circa 1090.1 As of 1113,her married name was Scotland.1 She married David I, King of Scotland "the Saint", son of Malcolm III, King of Scotland "Canmore" and Margaret of England Ste. Margaret of Scotland, in 1113.1 Maud, Countess of Huntingdon died circa 1130 at Scotland.2

Citations

  1. [S308] Ancestral Roots, Seventh ed. , 130.
  2. [S308] Ancestral Roots, Seventh ed. , 147.

David I, King of Scotland "the Saint"1

M, b. circa 1080, d. 24 May 1153
Father*Malcolm III, King of Scotland "Canmore" b. 1031, d. 13 Nov 1093
Mother*Margaret of England Ste. Margaret of Scotland b. 1045, d. 16 Nov 1093
     David was born at Scotland circa 1080.1 He married Maud, Countess of Huntingdon, daughter of Waltheof II, Earl of Huntingdon and Judith of Lens, in 1113.2 David died on 24 May 1153 at Carlisle, Cumbria, Scotland.1

Citations

  1. [S308] Ancestral Roots, Seventh ed. , 147.
  2. [S308] Ancestral Roots, Seventh ed. , 130.
  3. [S308] Ancestral Roots, Seventh ed. , 148.

Waltheof II, Earl of Huntingdon1

M, b. circa 1045, d. 31 May 1076
Father*Siward Biornsson Earl of Northumbria2 b. c 1020, d. 1055
Mother*Aelfflaed of Bernicia2 b. c 1031
     He was one of the very few Saxon earls who was allowed to keep his earldom under William the Conqueror. Waltheof was born at probably, England, circa 1045.3 He married Judith of Lens, daughter of Lambert of Boulogne Count of Lens and Adelaide, Countess of Aumale, at England in 1070.1 Waltheof died on 31 May 1076 at Beheaded at, Winchester, Hampshire, England.1

Family

Judith of Lens b. 1054
Child

Citations

  1. [S308] Ancestral Roots, Seventh ed. , 130.
  2. [S615] George Andrews Moriarty, Plantagenet Ancestry of King Edward III, 183.
  3. [S776] Roderick W. Stuart, Royalty for Commoners, 162.

Judith of Lens

F, b. 1054
Father*Lambert of Boulogne Count of Lens d. 1054
Mother*Adelaide, Countess of Aumale b. c 1030, d. b 1090
     She was a niece of William the Conqueror. Judith was born at France in 1054.1 As of 1070,her married name was Huntingdon.1 She married Waltheof II, Earl of Huntingdon, son of Siward Biornsson Earl of Northumbria and Aelfflaed of Bernicia, at England in 1070.1

Family

Waltheof II, Earl of Huntingdon b. c 1045, d. 31 May 1076
Child

Citations

  1. [S308] Ancestral Roots, Seventh ed. , 130.

Lambert of Boulogne Count of Lens1

M, d. 1054
Father*Eustace I, Count of Boulogne d. 1049
Mother*Maud of Louvain
     Lambert was born.1 He married Adelaide, Countess of Aumale, daughter of Robert I, Duke of Normandy, after 1053. Lambert died in 1054 at Lille, France. Battle wounds.2

Family

Adelaide, Countess of Aumale b. c 1030, d. b 1090
Child

Citations

  1. [S308] Ancestral Roots, Seventh ed. , 130.
  2. [S308] Ancestral Roots, Seventh ed. , 115.